Joint Wound Care Formulary - Primary and Secondary Care


In this section

Introduction
Good practice in wound management
Topical antimicrobial therapy
Joint Wound Care Formulary

Introduction

The Grampian Wound Care Formulary has been developed to support clinicians within Grampian who are prescribing and/or applying wound care products. The aim of the formulary is to promote safe, evidence-based, effective and economical prescribing. 
The formulary is applicable to primary and secondary care, and there may be some variations between primary and secondary care provision of products. The formulary will also be made available to Care Homes across Grampian so their clinical practice reflects local guidance.

The formulary has been devised by a group of practitioners with knowledge and expertise, who are clinically responsible for wound care management. It provides a choice of products that are clinically- and cost-effective to manage the vast majority of wounds.
The products within the formulary are the only products that are to be used in wound care, unless there are particular circumstances where specialist wound care providers have deemed it appropriate to prescribe out with, i.e. Tissue Viability, Dermatology, Vascular, Podiatry, Plastic Surgery. Adoption of the formulary should ensure continuity of wound care across the primary and secondary care settings.

back to top symbol Back to top

Good Practice in Wound Management

  • Practitioners should have the skills and knowledge to manage wounds
  • Patients with a wound need a holistic assessment
  • Wounds need to be regularly reassessed
  • Dressing selection should be evidence-based and cost-effective
  • Dressing selection should encourage moist wound healing - where appropriate
  • Dressing selection should be appropriate to the stage of the wound healing
  • Antimicrobial products should only be used where an increased risk of infection or clinical signs of infection are apparent. Once an infection has resolved (recommend use of up to 14 days unless stated otherwise) treatment with an antimicrobial dressing should be stopped.
    Note: Clear instructions on the duration of antimicrobials, in most instances this should be restricted to two weeks unless there is clear clinical justification to continue for longer. If there are any concerns that the infection, local or systemic, may continue, antimicrobial therapy should not be stopped. In line with good practice, continued assessment of the wound should be undertaken.
  • Regular assessment and management of wounds should be documented in the wound assessment chart.  Generic wound assessment forms are available for use across Grampian - Stock number ZKB902
  • Wound pain should be assessed and controlled as appropriate

back to top symbol Back to top

Topical antimicrobial therapy

The primary intention of topical antimicrobial therapy such as silver, iodine and honey is to reduce wound bioburden. Where clinically justified preventative use of antimicrobials is indicated, this must be conducted in full recognition of the risk-benefit ratio. Clinical signs and symptoms associated with infection or critical colonization, i.e. delayed healing, increased fluid exudate, malodour, increased pain may indicate the use of topical antimicrobial therapy. Clear instructions on the duration of use, in most instances this should be restricted to two weeks unless there is clear clinical justification to continue for longer. If there are any concerns the infection, local or systemic, may continue, antimicrobial therapy should not be stopped. In line with good practice continued assessment of the wound should be undertaken. Antimicrobial therapy should be used with caution in paediatric patients and patients with decreased renal function.

Adapted from Best Practice Statement, The use of topical antiseptic/antimicrobial agents in wound management, Second edition, May 2011.

back to top symbol Back to top

Joint Wound Care Formulary

  • Full guidance - UNDER REVIEW - NHSG Joint Wound Care Formulary for primary and secondary care
  • Summary guide - UNDER REVIEW - Formulary Quick Reference Guide
 
Title
Date
Link opens in new windowIntroduction [PDF 27KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowActicoat® [PDF 19KB]
February 2012
February 2012
Link opens in new windowActiFormCool® [PDF 20KB]
February 2012
February 2012
February 2012
Link opens in new windowActivon® Tube [PDF 19KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowActivon Tulle® [PDF 19KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowAdaptic® Touch [PDF 21KB]
February 2012
February 2012
February 2012
Link opens in new windowAllevyn® Heel [PDF 20KB]
February 2012
February 2012
February 2012
Link opens in new windowAquacel® [PDF 19KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowAskina® Heel [PDF 20KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowAtrauman® [PDF 20KB]
February 2012
February 2012
Link opens in new windowCadesorb® [PDF 14KB]
February 2012
February 2012
February 2012
Link opens in new windowDebriSoft® [PDF 12KB]
February 2012
February 2012
February 2012
Link opens in new windowGranuflex® [PDF 24KB]
February 2012
February 2012
February 2012
Link opens in new windowHypafix® [PDF 9KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowInadine® [PDF 21KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowIodoflex® [PDF 21KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowIodosorb® [PDF 21KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowKaltostat® [PDF 17KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowMelolin® [PDF 22KB]
February 2012
February 2012
Link opens in new windowMepitac® [PDF 13KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowMepore® [PDF 20KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowMepore Ultra® [PDF 20KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowMesorb® [PDF 20KB]
February 2012
February 2012
Link opens in new windowPolymem® [PDF 21KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowPolymem® Islands [PDF 21KB]
February 2012
February 2012
Link opens in new windowSilvercel® [PDF 23KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowTegaderm® Film [PDF 20KB]
February 2012
Link opens in new windowZetuvit® Plus [PDF 20KB]
February 2012